Go to the profile of Aaron Voon-Yew Thean

Aaron Voon-Yew Thean

Professor, Electrical & Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore
  • National University of Singapore
  • +6597701401
  • Singapore

About Aaron Voon-Yew Thean

Aaron Thean is a Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Dean of the School of Engineering at the National University of Singapore. In addition, he holds several technical leadership responsibilities at the University; which includes Director of Applied Materials – NUS corporate research lab, HiFES research program on Hybrid Flexible Electronics, NUS’s Nanofabrication Centre, E6Nanofab. Prior to NUS, Aaron was the Vice President of Logic Technologies at imec in Belgium. Working with Semiconductor Industry leaders like Intel, TSMC, Samsung, and Globalfoundries. He directed the research and development of next-generation semiconductor technologies and emerging nano-device architectures. Prior to joining IMEC in 2011, he was with Qualcomm’s CDMA technologies in San Diego, California. From 2007 to 2009, Aaron was the Device Manager at IBM, where he led an eight-company process technology team to develop the 28-nm and 32-nm low-power bulk CMOS technology at IBM East Fishkill, New York, from research to risk production. Aaron graduated from the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana, USA, where he received his B.Sc. (Highest Honors), M.Sc., and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering. He has published over 300 technical papers and holds more than 50 US patents. Active in local and international advanced electronics communities, Aaron is an Editor of the IEEE Electron Device Letters and he serves on several Scientific Advisory Boards that include Singapore-MIT Alliance (SMART-LEES), A*Star Institute of Microelectronics (IME), and he is Consulting CTO for Process Technology to imec CEO.

Subject

2D and vdW Memristors Flexible electronics Bioelectronics Neuromorphic systems Transistors Analogue circuits VLSI Memory Sensors Nanoscale materials

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Contributor Nature Communications

2D Materials for 3D Electronics

We showed that 2-D materials like Tungsten Selenide can realize both transistors and resistive memories, and proposed the possibility to realize highly-scaled 3-D one-transistor one-resistor (1T1R) memories.

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